Top 100 Indians: #64 Ed Morgan

Ed Morgan - checkoutmycards.com

Another history lesson of a player most people did not know played for the Tribe, let alone in the major leagues.

Edward Carre Morgan

First Baseman, Right Fielder, 1928-1933

Height: 6'0" Weight: 180 lbs

Throws: Right Bats: Right

How Acquired: Amateur Free Agent, 1927

Left Via: Trade, Rule 5 draftee by the Red Sox, October 2, 1933

Next on the hit list is a name that perplexes many, Ed Morgan. Did he really play for the Tribe? I don't recall him. What makes him so special? Well, how about a guy who is tied for sixth all-time in average (.323); tied for fifth all-time in on base percentage (.405) and tenth all-time in OPS (898).

Morgan began his journey in Cairo, Illinois, being born to J.P. Morgan (not the financier John Pierpont) and Maggie in 1904, the family moved to Baton Rouge in 1910, where daddy was the manager of the Louisiana Box Factory which made both paper and wood boxes. Eddie was known as Buddy as a boy and spent his high school years at Rugby Academy, a military academy. He then attended Tulane university and is regarded as one of the greatest all-around athletes from that school. He played basketball, was a halfback, end and tackle in football, and of course played baseball as well. He graduated as a pharmaceutical chemist in five years.

The summer after graduating, he hooked up with the local New Orleans Pelicans of the Southern Association, an A ball independent (AA was the highest) at that time that had worked with the Indians over the years. Others purchased by the Tribe included Jim Bagby Sr., and Joe Sewell. He had 36 2B, 14 3B and 12 HR in 607 AB while hitting .354 that season

Those numbers drew the attention of at least 8 major league franchises, but the Indians won the bidding for him on August 13. Morgan finished the season, helping the Pelicans win the pennant and reported to spring training with the Indians in 1928. He made the team and had a solid 123 OPS+ in 297 PA that year splitting time at first base with Lew Fonseca and George Burns. In 1929, Lew Fonseca kept the first base job, so Morgan was the backup right fielder and was productive, 118 OPS+ in 360 PA, but a woeful 11 errors in 79 games.

In 1930, he began the season as the starter in RF. However, on May 27, Lew Fonseca was seriously injured and Morgan became the everyday 1B for the rest of the season. And what a fantastic season it became. He hit .349 with 26 HR (the first Indian to break 20), 136 RBI and 1.014 OPS (150 OPS+). The 26 HR was impressive as he was a right handed hitter and League Park had the reverse Green Monster effect. That 1930 season was indeed a special one as it is only one of 11 seasons with 120 runs, a .600 slugging percentage with the home runs less than one third of the extra base hits. Others on this list are Stan Musial, Lou Gehrig, Rogers Hornsby (twice), Bill Terry, George Sisler, Harry Heilmann, Tris Speaker, Nap Lajoie and Ty Cobb.

After that dominating season, Morgan was expecting a decent pay raise, but was sadly disappointed, even quipping that his father was wealthy and he could make more in the family business. After getting married in February 1931, he held out and was suspended by the team. He had another very good season, 351/451/511 147 OPS+, but his RS dropped by 35 and his RBI dropped by 50 and the homers dropped to 11. After the season, Cleveland let it be known he was available for a trade, but nothing materialized.

In 1932, in his age 28 season, his numbers took a huge dive, 293/402/402 103 OPS+. Never known for his glove, Morgan's had 18 errors in 1930, 19 in 1931 and a whopping 23 in 1932. After a mediocre 26-25 start in 1933, manager Roger Peckinpaugh was let go and former future fireballer Walter Johnson was brought in. He had witnessed Morgan as previous manager of the Nationals and really disliked his defense. Peckinpaugh had already benched Morgan after a 247/307/346 start. Johnson gave him a few more starts, but he was sent back to New Orleans on July 2. He hit .318 and slugged .494 for the last three months, which was enough for the Red Sox to claim him in the Rule 5 draft.

Morgan played a full year for the Red Sox but couldn't regain his stroke, finishing with a 267/367/352 83 OPS+ line. After the season, he was sold to the Cardinals Rochester affiliate. But he never played with them, spending 1935 and 1936 with his hometown Pelicans. He retired at 33 and rejoined his father's business. He passed away at age 75 in New Orleans in 1980.

Morgan also has a couple of interesting career highlights. He has the shortest career of any career .300 hitter who scored 500 runs and the second shortest career of .300 hitters with 400 RBI. He is also one of 23 players to have three doubles and one triple in one game. [The Tribe has seven of those twenty-three players: Morgan, George Burns, Lew Fonseca, Joe Vosmik, Earl Averill, Tito Francona and Carlos Baerga]

Sources

SABR Biography Project - Bill Nowlin; Cleveland Indians Encyclopedia, High Heat Stats

Indians Career Stats

Year Age Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+ TB HBP SH Pos
1928 24 CLE 76 297 265 42 83 24 6 4 54 5 5 21 17 .313 .366 .494 .860 123 131 1 9 3O85/9
1929 25 CLE 93 360 318 60 101 19 10 3 37 4 3 37 24 .318 .392 .469 .861 118 149 2 3 O9/7
1930 26 CLE 150 666 584 122 204 47 11 26 136 8 4 62 66 .349 .413 .601 1.014 150 351 1 19 *3O9
1931 27 CLE 131 552 462 87 162 33 4 11 86 4 5 83 46 .351 .451 .511 .961 147 236 1 6 *3/5
1932 28 CLE 144 637 532 96 156 32 7 4 68 7 6 94 44 .293 .402 .402 .804 103 214 3 8 *3/5
1933 29 CLE 39 129 121 10 32 3 3 1 13 1 1 7 9 .264 .305 .364 .668 73 44 0 1 3/7O
CLE (6 yrs) 633 2641 2282 417 738 158 41 49 394 29 24 304 206 .323 .405 .493 .898 127 1125 8 46
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/2/2013.

Selected Awards/Leaders

AL WAR: 8th, 1930-5.3

AL oWAR: 7th, 1930-5.4

AL Average: 3rd, 1931-.351; 9th, 1930-.349

AL On Base Percentage: 2nd, 1932-.402; 9th, 1931-.451

AL Slugging: 5th, 1930-.601; 9th, 1931-.511

AL OPS: 5th, 1930-1.014; 7th, 1931-.961

AL Runs Scored: 8th, 1930-122

AL Hits: 5th, 1930-204

AL TB: 5th, 1930-351

AL 2B: 3rd, 1930-47

AL HR: 6th, 1930-26

AL RBI: 6th, 1930-136

AL Bases on Balls: 6th, 1931-83; 6th, 1932-94

AL OPS+: 5th, 1930-150; 8th, 1931-147

AL RC: 5th, 1930-144

AL Extra Base Hits: 5th, 1930-84

AL Sacrifice Hits: 6th, 1930-19

AL Assists (1B): 2nd, 1930-80; 4th, 1931-72

AL Range Factor/Game 1B: 2nd, 1930-10.50; 2nd, 1932-10.59; 3rd, 1931-10.14

Cleveland Indians Career Leader

  • 48th WAR Position Players (12.9)
  • 41st oWAR (14.7)
  • t-6th Average (.323)
  • t-5th On Base Percentage (.405)
  • 15th Slugging (.493)
  • 10th OPS (.898)
  • 43rd Runs Scored (417)
  • 46th Doubles (158)
  • t-25th Triples (41)
  • 42nd Runs Batted In (394)
  • 43rd Bases On Balls (304)
  • 22nd OPS+ (127)
  • t-43rd Runs Created (450)
  • 46th Extra Base Hits (248)

Cleveland Indians Season Leader

  • t-27th Average (.351, 1931)
  • t-31st Average (.349, 1930)
  • 12th On Base Percentage (.451, 1931)
  • t-49th On Base Percentage (.413, 1930)
  • 17th Slugging (.601, 1930)
  • 20th OPS (1.014, 1930)
  • t-44th OPS (.961, 1931)
  • t-16th Runs Scored (122, 1930)
  • t-21st Hits (204, 1930)
  • 9th Total Bases (351, 1930)
  • t-18th Doubles (47, 1930)
  • t-9th Runs Batted In (136, 1930)
  • 33rd Bases On Balls (94, 1932)
  • t-12th Runs Created (144, 1930)

8th Extra Base Hits (84, 1930)

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join Let's Go Tribe

You must be a member of Let's Go Tribe to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Let's Go Tribe. You should read them.

Join Let's Go Tribe

You must be a member of Let's Go Tribe to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Let's Go Tribe. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9351_tracker